2017 exhibition program

2017 exhibition program

Artisan presents a program of exhibitions that showcase the best of emerging and established Australian makers. Our exhibitions focus on engaging with themes at the forefront of contemporary practice and investigate the crossovers between art, craft and design. We invite our audiences to explore, engage with, debate and take inspiration from our pioneering exhibitions.


4 February – 18 March 2017

Simon Degroot, Shape Poems (2017), laser cut acrylic, approx. 35 x 50cm.

Simon Degroot, Shape poems, 2017. Laser cut acrylic, approx. 35 x 50cm.

Our Kind of Playground

Gallery 1

The connections between space, touch, play and making are celebrated in Our Kind of Playground. Through a collection of interactive works and ‘play spaces’, this exhibition encourages you to touch, reassemble and understand through the action of play. Drawing the visitor to physically engage with exploring material and design thinking, Our Kind of Playground reaffirms Artisan’s thoughts on the universality of craft and design. Our Kind of Playground launches Artisan’s 2017 program of exhibitions and public programs.

Curated by Kellee Uhr.

Artists: Lincoln Austin, Simon Degroot and Anna Varendorff.

 

 

 


4 February – 18 March 2017

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Rebecca Ward, Bushcraft series, 2016. Found sticks and sterling silver.

Rebecca Ward | Bushcraft

SOS (Small Object Space)

This exhibition features a series of brooches that draw on the modern day survivalist movement and Ron Edwards’ popular book series from the 1970s and 80s from which the exhibition takes its name. Jeweller Rebecca Ward imagines a situation where the maker has nothing but sticks from the forest, a roll of wire and some basic tools to make wearables in her basic bush hut. The works set out to playfully map the effects of living in isolation and the madness and resourcefulness of the bush dweller, but family life disrupts this romantic proposition taking the work in an unexpected direction.

SOS is presented in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art. SOS is an exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the college’s best small object works from students, staff and alumni.

 

 


18 January – 28 February 2017

AUXILIARY Design School, Essence for sunbeam.

David Chapman for AUXILIARY Design School, Essence (for Sunbeam), 2015. ABS, spray painted and CNC machined. Photo by Leon Fitzpatrick.

AUXILIARY Design School – Design Ripe for the Picking

Ivory Street Window Gallery

AUXILIARY Design School is an independent industrial design school based in Brisbane that educates emerging designers through engagement with industry. It aims to raise the profile and appreciation of good design via a range of design and innovation training programmes, while engaging the broader public and celebrating the success of designers working in Brisbane and beyond. AUXILIARY X: Design Ripe for the Picking presents seven prototype models developed by AUXILIARY students for Sunbeam Australia which address the topics of healthy cooking, home gardening, and garment care.

 

 


14 March – 1 April 2017

Perspectives on a flat surface, 2016. Designed by John Wardle and woven by Chris Cochius, Pamela Joyce, Jennifer Sharpe, Cheryl Thornton. Wool and cotton. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.

Perspectives on a flat surface, 2016. Designed by John Wardle and woven by Chris Cochius, Pamela Joyce, Jennifer Sharpe, Cheryl Thornton. Wool and cotton. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.

2016 Tapestry Design Prize

The 2016 Tapestry Design Prize for Architects (TDPA) invited designs for a hypothetical tapestry to hang in the National Gallery of Australia. There is a long-standing historical connection between architectural space and tapestries. The Tapestry Design Prize for Architects is a platform to strengthen this connection between architects and the tapestry weaving practice. On display at Artisan are the designs by the 13 finalists from 2016, including the winning design by Justin Hill from Singapore. Also on display will be the monumental tapestry woven from the design of the 2015 TDPA joint winner John Wardle Architects and commissioned by Judith Nielsen AM for her new Phoenix Gallery in Sydney.

 

 

 


28 March – 3 June 2017

Tom Borgas, Postdigital Artefacts (concrete detail), 2013. Concrete. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Tom Borgas, Postdigital artefacts (concrete detail), 2013. Concrete. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Material: Concrete

Gallery 1

Material: Concrete explores the diversity and potential of concrete across all creative fields from the handmade to the industrially manufactured. It brings together architecture, design, art and jewellery to break the moulds of expectation we often unknowingly hold for the material.

This exhibition is part of the Asia Pacific Architecture Forum, an initiative of Architecture Media and the State Library of Queensland.

 

 

 


6 March – 7 May 2017

Jeanette Stok, Heredity, 2014. Galvanised wire and wire mesh Photo by Andrew Todd.

Jeanette Stok, Heredity, 2014. Galvanised wire and wire mesh Photo by Andrew Todd.

Jeanette Stok | Mutagenesis

Ivory Street Window Gallery 

Jeanette Stok is a Brisbane-based artist who is influenced by her work as a research scientist and the traditional crafts introduced to her by mother and grandmother. Stok’s wire embroidery installation, Mutagenesis, is created using Hardanger embroidery techniques, which traditionally employ repeated motifs to create symmetrical, geometric designs that share much in common with the replication of living cells. Stok transforms traditional Hardanger configurations to represent the concept of mutation that occurs when internal mistakes or external factors disrupt the patterns of living cells.

 

 

 


28 March – 3 June 2017

Helen Bird & Susan Hawkins | With + Within

SOS (Small Object Space)

Makers Susan Hawkins and Helen Bird explore the alchemic relationships between material, function and form through this exhibition. Working with similar repurposed and recycled materials, Hawkins and Bird provide familiar glimpses of craft and design histories in their sculptural forms. With + Within transforms traditional processes and functions into new experiences and invites viewers to explore the works with a sense of curiosity in surface and form.

SOS is presented in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art. SOS is an exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the college’s best small object works from students, staff and alumni.

 


23 May – 3 July 2017

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Photo courtesy of the artist.

Chantal Fraser | To be Poly Penitent

Ivory Street Window Gallery

To be Poly Penitent is an installation by Brisbane-based artist Chantal Fraser that considers the ritual of penance through the presentation of an ifoga ceremony (a Samoan ritual of public humiliation, forgiveness and exchange). Through this work Fraser asks us to consider our artistic, social and cultural penance in an attempt to highlight contradictory social and political symbolic appropriation.

 

 


Luke Maninov Hammond, Unfolding (detail), Sterling silver, gold vermeil, patina,and Australian parti sapphires. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Luke Maninov Hammond, Unfolding (detail), 2017. Sterling silver, gold vermeil, patina,and Australian parti sapphires. Photo courtesy of the artist.

16 June – 19 August 2017

Luke Maninov Hammond | Beneath the Surface

Gallery 1

Beneath the Surface presents fine jewellery and objects by Luke Maninov Hammond which explore the shared patterns of life. Inspired by Luke’s work in neuroscience, delicate forms of ordered complexity simultaneously represent the invisible worlds of cellular machinery, marine life, and dynamic connectivity within the brain. More broadly, the works reflect the unfolding nature of life, inviting us to contemplate on our coming out of the world, rather than coming into it.

Luke Maninov Hammond is a Brisbane based jeweller and neuroscience imaging specialist, whose work has been exhibited internationally and featured in fashion magazines. In addition to jewellery and object fabrication, Luke is recognised for his contributions to teaching, applying advanced imaging techniques in neuroscience research and publishing. He works alongside neuroscientists investigating topics such as learning and memory, and diseases like Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia.

This exhibition is presented in partnership with Pieces of Eight Gallery and Queensland Brain Institute at University of Queensland.

Read the Beneath the Surface catalogue here.

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QBI-Logo

 

 

 


16 June – 19 August 2017

Sarah.x.Isabella | Seitanic Beach

Small Object Space

Sarah.x.Isabella, Sascus and Tragix, 2017. Photo by Jessic McMaster.

Sarah.x.Isabella, Sascus and Tragix, 2017. Photo by Jessic McMaster.

Sarah.x.Isabella is a Brisbane-based jeweller who illustrates possible dystopian futures through her work.  The name Seitanic Beach refers to the faux fish Sarah imagines we will be forced to eat in the future due to the mutation of marine creatures caused by pollution. Inspired by the dark aesthetic of metal and punk rock, each individual piece represents a mutated sea creature among its endangered coral habitat.

SOS is presented in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art. SOS is an exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the college’s best small object works from students, staff and alumni.

 

 

 

 


5 July – 21 August 2017

Dana Lawrie | Comfortable Silence

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Dana Lawrie, Comfortable silence, 2017. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Ivory St Window Gallery

Comfortable Silence by emerging Queensland artist, Dana Lawrie, continues Lawrie’s exploration of self-portraiture by using repetitive and transformative processes to negotiate a relationship between permanence and impermanence. Comfortable Silence is created using both fine art and craft materials such as oil paint, natural dyes, dyed yarn and cotton rags. Throughout the process of creating this work, Lawrie has emphasised a personal relationship these material. She achieves this through multiple ways, including by growing and collecting flowers and plants that she then soaks, juices, dries and boils to dye yarn; using embroidering techniques taught to her by her mother; and rending her own features in pallid oil paint.

The resulting work seeks to amalgamate fine art and craft practices, bringing together materials, regardless of ‘high’ or ‘low’ connotation, to situate an honest sense of impulse and intuition in the quest to put forward an appreciation of quiet reflections in relation to mortality and the self.

 

 

 


16 – 25 August 2017

Millinery Association of Australia Design Awards 2017

Felicity Northeast, Floral Dissection, 2017. Winner of the MMA Design Award 2017. Photo by Teardrop Studios.

Felicity Northeast, Floral dissection, 2017. Winner of the MMA Design Award 2017. Photo by Teardrop Studios.

Workshop space

This pop-up exhibition will showcase the Queensland entries alongside the winning, runner up and people’s choice designs from the Millinery Association of Australia Design Awards 2017.

This exhibition is presented in partnership with the Millinery Association of Australia.

Basic RGB

 

 

 

 


26 August – 18 November 2017

Michelle Stemm, Culture clash, 2016. Antique silver salt shaker tops and stainless steel sweet dish. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Michelle Stemm, Culture clash, 2016. Antique silver salt shaker tops and stainless steel sweet dish. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Michelle Stemm | Empathy to Infiltration

Small Object Space

Michelle Stemm is a silversmith based in Brisbane. Through her work she explores impact of human migration around the globe and the impact this has on communities. In 2016, Stemm conducted one-on-one interviews and researched social and print media to examine Australian citizens’ attitudes towards asylum seekers seeking protection in Australia and how their attitudes are formed.

Empathy to Infiltration aims to visually depict Stemm’s research findings through reclaimed serve-ware. Stemm uses recognisable symbols and motifs to express key messages that she believes shape the way Australian’s think and feel about asylum seekers.

SOS is presented in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art. SOS is an exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the college’s best small object works from students, staff and alumni.

Read Michelle Stemm’s Opening Speech here.

 

 

 


22 August – 2 October 2017

Will Marx, Last Leaf (installation view), 2017. Photo by @smend_.

Will Marx, Last Leaf (installation view), 2017. Photo by @smend_.

Will Marx | Last Leaf

Ivory St Window Gallery

Last Leaf challenges the archetypal functionality of sideboards where more often than not, everything and anything is recklessly thrown into it. Designed and built to last for generations to come, Will Marx uses a combination of both traditional and contemporary furniture making techniques to craft his masterpieces. Last Leaf demonstrates how a single solitary leaf alone can be a purposeful representation of quintessential mindful minimalism in our home. The exhibition is a creative interpretation of society’s attitudes towards material belongings and excessiveness.

 

 

 


4 October – 6 November 2017

Gwan Tung Dorothy Lau | Gloom

Ivory St Window Gallery

Gwan Tung Dorothy Lau, Gloom, 2017, mixed media. Courtesy of the artist.Gwan Tung Dorothy Lau critically examines the construction of cultural and racial identity, and the issue of cultural assimilation with digital manipulated photography and installation. Extending her soft sculpture installations conceptually in the form of wearable art, Gloom presents the perplexity of assessing her identity – an amalgam of her Hong Kong upbringing and Australian education – as a burden to the body. Using a mixture of garment making methodologies and domestic crafting processes, Gloom conveys the desire to retreat from the difficult process of introspection and reconnect to the safety and certainty of childhood. Drawing on her peripatetic youth, Lau’s practice provides an intimate reflection on the sentiment of displacement experienced globally and collectively.

Gloom is presented in conjunction with Brisbane Fashion Month.

 

 

 

 


8 November – 24 December 2017

Natalie Haskell | digi flora

Ivory Street Window Gallery

digi flora focuses on the possibilities of digital fabrication within craft practice. Natalie Haskell uses many digital technologies through a range of materials, exploring the idea of translating the natural world into a digital form. Digital tools are explored as a way to extend craft and design practice, while also not losing elements of play and experimentation that the handmade process allows


 


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