2016 Exhibition Program

2016 Exhibition Program

Artisan presents a program of exhibitions that showcase the best of emerging and established Australian makers. Our exhibitions focus on engaging with themes at the forefront of contemporary practice and investigate the crossovers between art, craft and design. We invite our audiences to explore, engage with, debate and take inspiration from our pioneering exhibitions.


29 November – 24 December 2016

Meet the Makers

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Kirralee and Co, Gum geo-pod. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Meet the Makers showcases what is unique to Artisan: Queensland makers and their stories. With a festive marketplace atmosphere and makers in residence throughout the exhibition, visitors will be able to witness makers at work and have the opportunity to hear about and buy their creations. The exhibition also launches the Meet the Makers page on the Artisan website, which profiles an ever growing number of local makers. Bringing together a selection of local makers from jewellers to textile artists and ceramists to fashion designers, all of whom are passionate about telling their story, this exhibition offers a unique opportunity to Meet the Makers.

Artists: Anita Chew, Arkie Barton, Birdy & Clementine, Dasomm, Delvene Cockatoo-Collins, Elisa Jane Carmichael, Charlie & Blair, Erin Lightfoot, JD. Lee Furniture, JEANBAG, Kirralee & Co., KT Doyle, Lisa Guy, Liz Sofield, Phoebe Paradise, Salt Water Murris, Spun Mud and Susan Simonini.

 

Exhibition continues to 24 December 2016.


29 November – 24 December 2016

Production Run

SOS (Small Object Space)

Claire Poppi.

Claire Poppi.

This exhibition explores the nature and potential of ‘production’ jewellery and its relationship to one-off pieces within an artist’s practice. It features the work of Queensland College of Art students, staff and alumni who create production jewellery and small objects as part of their creative practice. Purchase your favourite Production Run pieces in our retail store for the perfect hand crafted gift.

Artists: Alison Bruce, Andy Lowrie, Bianca Mavrick, Clare Poppi, Georgina Baveas, Helen Moriarty, Jemica Ostrofski, Jesika Dawn, Jessica McMaster, Kathryn Wardill, Katie Stormonth, Lucille Atkins, Mia Wells, Milly Bell, Minna Jun, Renata Fojtikova, Robyn Pell, Sarah Beutel, Saskia Levy, Vivien Bedwell, Stephanie Rachael Corthorne, Susie Woodhouse and Vanessa Williams.
SOS is presented in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art.

SOS is an exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the college’s best small object works from students, staff and alumni.


image-credit-james-bourbon

5 October – 20 November 2016

Poly Gone Cowboy | Reprographica

Ivory Street Window Gallery

Reprographica is an installation by Poly Gone Cowboy, a creative screen printing business and studio, featuring visual artists Samuel Tupou, James Bourbon and Geoff Monk. This collaborative installation creates new imagery by manipulating graphic materials using outdated modes, from analogue cut-and-paste to 8-bit computer graphics software. The imagery in Reprographica will also feature in the installation on Poly Gone Cowboy’s new range of limited edition, hand screen printed t-shirts.

This exhibition features as part of the Brisbane Fashion Month.

 


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Image: Megan Puls, Mangrove series 1-10, 2016. Scarva stoneware clay. Photo by Jaala Alex.

13 September – 19 November 2016

Objects of Desire: Contemporary Clay

Gallery 1

Clay transforms, permanent, mutable, changeable. This is an exhibition about material transforming, from a lump of dirt into a myriad of forms. Clay is a an expressive material, from the belly of a bowl to the gestural marks of an abstract sculpture there is something seductive about clay, it calls out for human touch.

The making of an artwork in the studio is a very limited, private performance. The physicality of working with clay and drawing is rarely discussed, as it is a side of an artist’s life that is almost never made public. Pushing blocks of clay around, denting, altering and moving over the surface of form, the physical rhythm of making is a large part of a ceramic artist’s life. Clay is heavy; being able to manipulate it requires strength and ingenuity to solve technical problems that arise between the material and the human body.

This exhibition highlights 10 Queensland artists working with clay from the raw woodfired works of Ray Cavill to the refined, delicate porcelain of Anne Mossman. These objects are highlighted and linked by the ephemeral eco installation of artist Tijn Meulendjiks, his, airy, gravity defying installation a physical embodiment of the idea of desire. Tijn’s installations and Shannon Garson’s exhibition design draws the viewer further and further into the luscious, mysterious, tactile, colourful world of Objects of Desire.

Artists: Mollie Bosworth, Andrew Bryant, Ray Cavill, Janet Fieldhouse, Chizuko Jones, Clairy Laurence, Tijn Meulendijks, Pru Morrison, Anne Mossman, Jenny Mulcahy and Megan Puls.


Image: Ari Fuller, Virtues of Fate, 2016. Argentium silver, sterling silver, and vitreous plique-a-jour enamel.

13 September – 19 November 2016

Ari Fuller | Dark Forest, Gold City

SOS (Small Object Space)

Artist and jeweller Ari Fuller’s intricate works in this exhibition combine plique-a-jour enamel and Argentium silver to tell a personal story of a world evolving and beautiful. Inspired by Egyptian jewellery, Lalique and Faberge, Fuller employs many symbols in his work, from death and masks to trees and the sun, to weave narratives of his experiences.

 

 

 


22 August – 2 October 2016

Image: Tom Emmett, Mundanity Continued, 2016. EPS, polyurethane and acrylic. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Tom Emmett | Mundanity Continued

Ivory St Window Gallery

Born from a diminishing cube, the curvaceous forms of Mundanity Continued have been individually sculpted from solid offcut pieces of foam. The original form, which was developed while Tom was studying at Central Saint Martins in London, has progressed to take on different scales and functions. Handcrafted and industrial processes converge in these pieces, with the forms being individually carved yet modular with an industrially applied coating. Additionally, the polystyrene foam is commonly associated with packaging rather than traditional craft. These pieces aim to pose questions about the relationship between handcrafting and industrial design manufacturing, and explore the possibilities of sculpting for design and industry.

 

 


Marlu tjitjitjara (kangaroo with joey) by Angkuna Kulyuru (Pukatja community, SA), 2014. Tjanpi Weavers.

Image: Marlu tjitjitjara (kangaroo with joey) by Angkuna Kulyuru (Pukatja community, SA), 2014. Tjanpi Weavers.

5 July – 3 September 2016

Strung

Gallery 1

Strung tells the stories of fibre from a diversity of cultures within our region. It celebrates the translation of techniques honed in ancient weaving crafts into contemporary forms: the weaving of new narratives through fibres looped upon themselves.

The exhibition brings together works from diverse locations and differing sensibilities, from the steamy pandanus forest of the Top End and sand hills of the Central Desert to across the Strait in Papua New Guinea and back to the urban jungles of Australia. To create these works, the artists collect raw materials from their environment, design and redesign traditional and innovative weaving processes, and with nimble hands craft objects of purpose and great beauty that express unique contemporary stories.

Curated by Lisa Beilby and artisan.

Artists: Casselle Mountford, Florence Jaukae and the Goroka Bilum Weavers,  Girringun Aboriginal Arts Centre, Injalak Arts, Lucy Irvine,  and the Tjanpi Desert Weavers.


A_Lowrie_2015_TogetherTokenGreen_Detail_Copper_Silver_Paint_Silk

Image: Andy Lowrie, Together token green (Detail), 2015. Copper, silver, paint and silk.

5 July – 3 September 2016

Andy Lowrie | Sentinels and Spectres 

Small Object Space

This exhibition is a continuation of Andy Lowrie’s 2014 brooch series Sentinels and Spectres. Informed by historic jewellery and craft objects, Sentinels and Spectres captures Andy’s interpretation of landscapes he experiences by fusing natural and manmade elements. The exhibition features new pieces created in Tallinn, Estonia during an internship with Tanel Veenre, renowned jeweller and Associate Professor of Jewellery at the Estonian Academy of the Arts. Sentinels and Spectres reflects on the personal, political and spiritual connections Andy has with his surroundings, and explores how place can be represented through the craft of jewellery making.


Elysha Rei (Gould), The king’s confidant (detail), 2016. Paper cut. Courtesy of the artist.

Image: Elysha Rei (Gould), The king’s confidant (detail), 2016. Paper cut. Courtesy of the artist.

11 July – 21 August 2016

Elysha Rei | The King’s Confidant

Ivory St Window Gallery

Elysha Rei is a Japanese-Australian artist who draws upon her mixed heritage to explore the transition between places, cultures and communities. She uses paper cutting techniques derived from traditional folk art to create works that respond to her cross-cultural experiences. The King’s Confidant is a large-scale paper cut inspired by Elysha’s experience of the stainglass windows in the private royal pray chamber in the Tower of London in England. By drawing on these medieval designs, Elysha plays on the idea that the windows were privy to royal confessions and prayers and thus became confidants of past Kings.

 

 

 


Phoebe McDonald, Part of the whole, 2015. Porcelain.

Image: Phoebe McDonald, Part of the whole, 2015. Porcelain.

30 May – 10 July 2016

Phoebe McDonald | Dust. Ashes.

Ivory St Window Gallery

Dust. Ashes. is the result of a recent residency at Sunday Morning@EKWC in Holland, and marks a new direction in Phoebe McDonald’s practice. The title of the exhibition refers to the craft of ceramics – a new medium for Phoebe. ‘Dust’ alludes to the material of clay, refined in riverbeds over thousands of years and combined with bone, and ‘Ashes’ refers to the firing process. These porcelain pieces continue Phoebe’s exploration of reflected light and shadow, illusion and perception, surface and depth.

This project was made possible by the generous support of Sunday Morning@ekwc, Arts Queensland and the Copyright Agency.


18 April – 29 May 2016

Lucy-Belle Rayner | A Study in Bones

Ivory St Window Gallery

This exhibition features a unique collection of limited edition garments by Brisbane-based emerging fashion and textile designer, Lucy-Belle Rayner. Under her label, Lucy-Belle, the collection showcases meticulous hand sewing and fabric manipulation techniques in the construction of highly detailed garments. Created from exclusive digitally printed textiles, A Study in Bones is an exploration of the unexpected beauty and fragility of animal skeletons.


Image: Megan Mackenzie, Tailgater - Ann street & Edward Street, 2nd October 2014, 2015. Brooch, found broken car plastics and recycled sterling silver. Photo by Jen Eales.

Image: Megan Mackenzie, Tailgater – Ann street & Edward Street, 2nd October 2014, 2015. Brooch, found broken car plastics and recycled sterling silver. Photo by Jen Eales.

19 April – 25 June 2016

Megan MacKenzie | Tailgater

Small Object Space

Tailgater is an exhibition of jewellery objects by Megan MacKenzie.  Made predominantly from car plastics found on or alongside Brisbane roads since 2013, each piece is a material documentation of a collision in time and space. By using collected pieces of broken car plastics in her work, Megan investigates the environmental and social impacts of car collisions and, at the same time, creates a new life and form for the broken pieces left behind by these accidents.

Tailgater features in our Small Object Space (SOS) presented in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art. SOS is an exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the college’s best jewellery and small object works from student, staff and alumni.

 

 


Little Peach Co, David Atkinson with Heidelberg Platen Press. Courtesy of the artist.

Image: Little Peach Co, David Atkinson with Heidelberg Platen Press. Courtesy of the artist.

19 April – 25 June 2016

The Apprenticeship

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The Apprenticeship exhibition celebrates the work and stories of thirteen artisans, from blacksmiths and shoemakers to sign-writers and furniture makers, all striving to preserve traditional crafts and trades that have declined at the hands of mass production. This exhibition reveals how these artisans have pioneered pathways to gaining these skills, reinventing ‘the apprenticeship’ for today. The creativity and shifts in practice showcased in this exhibition highlight the challenges of reviving traditional handcrafts in a marketplace vastly different from the one in which they originally evolved. The Apprenticeship ultimately provides a platform for discussion around contemporary pathways to acquiring traditional craft and trade skills and creating value of them in today’s economy.

Curated by Richard Stride and Aaron Barton.

Artists: Aaron Barton (Backwoods Original), David Atkinson (Little Peach Co.), Ian Morgan (Tinkers World), Peter Bosworth (Bosworth Drum Co.), Emily Devers and Rick Hayward (Frank & Mimi), Eleisha Nylund (Nylund – Handcrafted Design), Lachlan Park (LP Workshop), David Bradley (Dragonforge), Clare Kennedy (Five Mile Radius), Karim and Leila Haddad (Tharwa Valley Forge), and Rachel Ayland (Bangalow Shoemaking).

Find the digital catalogue here.

Exhibition continues to 25 June 2016.


Catherine Large, Vessel, 2015. Sterling silver, pure silver and re-purposed glass bottle neck. Photo by Michelle Bowden.

Image: Catherine Large, Vessel, 2015. Sterling silver, pure silver and re-purposed glass bottle neck. Photo by Michelle Bowden.

1 March – 9 April 2016

Catherine Large | Strange Objects

Small Object Space (SOS)

Jewellery and small object artist Catherine Large draws on her experience of the nature of objects to inform this exhibition. Preferring materials with a former life, she works predominantly with items inherited or collected from places lived or travelled to, examining them and finding considered new uses and configurations for them. The transformation of objects of opaque and mysterious origins in Large’s work becomes a contemplative process of considering and imagining their histories.

Strange objects launches artisan’s partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art in programming an exhibition space in 2016 showcasing the college’s best student, staff and alumni work.

Download the Strange Objects exhibition catalogue here.

 

 


March 2016 – March 2017

Small Object Space QCA Partnership

Small Object Space

The Small Object Space (formally Gallery 2) will be programmed in partnership with Griffith University’s Queensland College of Art (QCA). The program for the space will feature six exhibitions of work by QCA students, alumni and staff, to be selected via a panel of artisan and QCA representatives. This partnership aims to showcase and the best emerging craft and design talent with a focus on small objects and jewellery work.


Owen and Vokes and Peters, P&G Table, 2014. Tasmanian oak. Photo by Jon Linkins.

Image: Owen and Vokes and Peters, P&G Table, 2014. Tasmanian oak. Photo by Jon Linkins.

1 March – 9 April 2016

Vokes and Peters | Detail and Manner

Gallery 1

This exhibition investigates the work of architecture practice Vokes and Peters, renowned for its unique exploration of the Queensland house and its aesthetic of austerity. Through a focus on their design of furniture and objects, which often accompany their architectural projects, Detail and manner will explore the reciprocal relationships between architecture and design practices working from the minute to the macro.

This multi-faceted exhibition will showcase new and existing objects, including works produced collaboratively with designers and craftspeople, within an innovative installation based approach to exploring architectural practice.

This event is part of the Asia Pacific Architecture Forum, an initiative of Architecture Media and the State Library of Queensland.


29 February –17 April 2016

Virginia Jones and Francesca Travers | Silent Spring

Ivory St window gallery

This exhibition, presented in partnership with Brisbane City Council, showcases the work created through a mentoring project between renowned ceramist Virginia Jones and emerging ceramist Francesca Travers. The Ageless Creative Enterprise Mentoring Project is a peer-to-peer intergenerational mentoring project proudly supported by Brisbane City Council. The aim is to match mentors’ skills in their creative disciplines with requests from another practitioner who can provide the training and assistance needed. Through this exchange, a mentor’s skill base can be extended and individuals have the opportunity to develop a partnership that could create an arts-related business or practice.

 


Alice Payne, Vest: Jade and pink silk organza, 2015. Silk organza and merino wool.

Image: Alice Payne, Vest: Jade and pink silk organza, 2015. Silk organza and merino wool.

18 January – 28 February 2016

Alice Payne | Garden of Shrinking Violets

Ivory St window gallery

In Garden of shrinking violets, designer Alice Payne explores design for re-configurability through half-scale laser cut silk garments that can ‘grow’ or ‘shrink’ with user interaction. The work features layering, threading and knotting, drawing on traditional quilting techniques to form embellished surfaces. The result is a system in which the laser cut grid and knotting form a patterning device integral to the garments’ construction.

 

 


David Shaw, Story Five (Trivet) (in progress), 2015. Macadamia timber.

Image: David Shaw, Story Five (Trivet) (in progress), 2015. Macadamia timber.

14 November 2015 – 20 February 2016

Quench | Table Stories

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Stories expressed in Australian Timber by Australian Designers.

The Quench design collective has pursued an exciting design research project in conjunction with a Queensland macadamia producer. They have revealed the potential value of discarded macadamia timber by creating a series of beautiful design artifacts, each with its own story, which highlight the unique grain of this native Australian hardwood.


14 November 2015 – 20 February 2016

Elizabeth Shaw, Diver, 2014. Found terracotta body, recycled and reused sterling silver. Photo by Michelle Bowden.

Image: Elizabeth Shaw, Diver, 2014. Found terracotta body, recycled and reused sterling silver. Photo by Michelle Bowden.

Yang 杨 + Shaw 肖 | Tales from the Studio

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Xiaohui Yang (Shandong, China) and Elizabeth Shaw (Brisbane) make jewellery and objects that explore ideas about society and culture. Yang is inspired by the

clash between traditional Chinese and Western customs, whereas Shaw’s work investigates symbolism and functionality of objects by reimagining broken and discarded items. This exhibition reveals the connections and distinctions between their practices.

Download Yang 杨 +Shaw 肖 | Tales from the Studio catalogue here.

Yang 杨 + Shaw 肖 | Tales from the Studio Exhibition brand and catalogue designed by LIVEWORM.


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